You shouldn’t have followed me.

(Source: kiiseru)


seananmcguire:

Tiger chubs tiger chubs TIGER CHUBS YOU GUYS

seananmcguire:

Tiger chubs tiger chubs TIGER CHUBS YOU GUYS



nebroska:

tbh asexual/aromantic representation is super fucking important because i didnt know what aromantacy was until about six months ago and im 18, almost 19 years old. i thought something was so fucking wrong with me. i forced myself into romantic relationships and lied to the people i cared about just to try and fix myself and ended up hurting them and ruining a lot of friendships in the process. if you dont think ace/aro representation is important then i dont have time for you.


hms-no-fun:

bluesigma:

sosungjackskellington:

dragon-of-the-stars:

grinningmoonlight:

did-you-kno:

Where there are wolves, there are ravens. Ravens follow wolves around a lot, mostly because they just seem to like them. They aren’t known to follow other predators and they prefer to eat with the wolves instead of alone. Source

wait are you telling me that wolves keep ravens as petscause this is the most goth thing ever since My Immortal

It would be an easier way for the raven’s to get food. And I bet the wolf doesn’t mind the companionship either.

it’s mutualism! Ravens circle ungulate herds and wolf packs, wolves see them, find the animal faster, kill the animal and open up the carcass(which ravens can’t peck through), and then the ravens eat and the nice juicy bits.
oh, and the pet anology is back-assward. ravens play with wolves. and more importantly, wolf pups. you know how animals raised together from a young age are super tolerant of one another? ravens exploit that to get better access to carcasses. 

yeah i was gonna say it sounds more like the ravens are keeping the wolves as pets

This is an interesting case of human language parameters (or, anyway, English language parameters) influencing the tone of a neutral fact. The intimation of an owner/pet relationship is the result of a species who hasn’t been anywhere but top of the food chain in living memory, and for whom creatures of the wild have long since been tamed and house-broken.
However, ~500,000 years ago, when early humans were first emerging from Africa, we developed a similar relationship with wolves. It’s theorized that humans and wolves, both being highly social pack hunters, noticed the similarity in their hunting styles and quickly learned the benefit of a creature on the hunt.
This is one of my favorite images of prehistoric man, and one that doesn’t appear much in media- wolf teaching man, through action, of the habits and strategies necessary to take down the megafauna of the time. Man and wolf as equals in a world of giants, hesitantly friendly when time permitted. Before we were the masters of the world, we were just another animal. These sorts of mutualistic relationships are more common in nature than one might expect, but that’s entirely because we approach it from a human exceptionalist perspective.

hms-no-fun:

bluesigma:

sosungjackskellington:

dragon-of-the-stars:

grinningmoonlight:

did-you-kno:

Where there are wolves, there are ravens. Ravens follow wolves around a lot, mostly because they just seem to like them. They aren’t known to follow other predators and they prefer to eat with the wolves instead of alone. Source

wait are you telling me that wolves keep ravens as pets

cause this is the most goth thing ever since My Immortal

It would be an easier way for the raven’s to get food. And I bet the wolf doesn’t mind the companionship either.

it’s mutualism! Ravens circle ungulate herds and wolf packs, wolves see them, find the animal faster, kill the animal and open up the carcass(which ravens can’t peck through), and then the ravens eat and the nice juicy bits.

oh, and the pet anology is back-assward. ravens play with wolves. and more importantly, wolf pups. you know how animals raised together from a young age are super tolerant of one another? ravens exploit that to get better access to carcasses. 

yeah i was gonna say it sounds more like the ravens are keeping the wolves as pets

This is an interesting case of human language parameters (or, anyway, English language parameters) influencing the tone of a neutral fact. The intimation of an owner/pet relationship is the result of a species who hasn’t been anywhere but top of the food chain in living memory, and for whom creatures of the wild have long since been tamed and house-broken.

However, ~500,000 years ago, when early humans were first emerging from Africa, we developed a similar relationship with wolves. It’s theorized that humans and wolves, both being highly social pack hunters, noticed the similarity in their hunting styles and quickly learned the benefit of a creature on the hunt.

This is one of my favorite images of prehistoric man, and one that doesn’t appear much in media- wolf teaching man, through action, of the habits and strategies necessary to take down the megafauna of the time. Man and wolf as equals in a world of giants, hesitantly friendly when time permitted. Before we were the masters of the world, we were just another animal. These sorts of mutualistic relationships are more common in nature than one might expect, but that’s entirely because we approach it from a human exceptionalist perspective.



everydaylouie:

cookin’ up trouble

everydaylouie:

cookin’ up trouble


eunnieboo:

yeah



*draws figures wearing oven mitts so I don’t have to draw hands*

grawly:

phantomdoodler:

okay but at this summer art program I really did have a classmate who created this whole complex world for his comic and the culture of the main characters considered hands to be inappropriate parts of the body and everyone wore oven mitt like things to fulfill this extensively developed world he had created just so he wouldn’t have to draw hands

absolutely fucking incredible